Everything you need to know about career development goals


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To find your values, think about what you care about most and what you don’t want. For example, if you like animals but hate bugs then animals would be a value that you hold dear while bugs would not.

Setting an achievable but challenging goal

Setting an achievable but challenging goal will motivate you to achieve more than if you simply wish for something to happen. Make sure that your goal is specific and measurable so that someone else can determine if it was successful or not. After each goal has been accomplished compare it to the original goal to see if it was worth it, this will help you set better goals in the future.

You also want to make sure that your goals fit with what you want out of life and not just your job. A goal of making more money may be good for your career but it might not be what you want out of life. If you value time with your family then it would be better to set a goal that reflects that by only working during certain hours of the day, for example.

If after reviewing your current position you don’t think there’s any way to achieve future goals within the company there are other options available. You can keep doing what you’re doing and hope for a promotion, search for another job that offers what you’re looking for, or start your own business. No matter what you choose make sure to keep track of your goals and progress so you can stay on track.

Setting and achieving goals is an important part of any career, make sure to take the time to figure out what you want and then create a plan to get there. Once you have a clear idea of your goals it’s time to start working towards them. Remember to keep your goals realistic and achievable, otherwise you’ll lose motivation. Finally, make sure that your goals are in line with what you want out of life not just your job. With these tips in mind, achieving your career goals is within reach.

When creating a goal it’s important to make sure it is specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and time-bound (SMART). This will ensure that the goal is achievable and can be easily measured to see if it was successful or not. Below are some examples of SMART goals:

Specific: I will run for 30 minutes every day

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I will run for 30 minutes every day Measurable: I will keep track of how long it takes me to finish the daily run and if the time increases over a period of time then that shows that my fitness level is increasing.

I will keep track of how long it takes me to finish the daily run and if the time increases over a period of time then that shows that my fitness level is increasing. Achievable: There are times when I might not feel like running but 30 minutes is manageable for everyone so it should be achievable.

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